The EECS Department has well-equipped instruction and research laboratories for electronic circuits, digital circuits, solid-state electronics, biomedical electronics, communications, microwave techniques, real-time control systems, holography, fiber-optics, coherent light optics, digital systems design, computer systems (including distributed and parallel systems), security, networking, computer graphics, artificial intelligence, computer vision, and robotics.

In addition, the Department has excellent computing facilities, with most of its computers upgraded in the last three years and all of its computers linked to Northwestern University's ever-evolving high-speed backbone network connection to the Internet. Specifically, the Center for Ultra-scale Computing and Information Security [CUCIS] has several Sun Solaris and Red Hat Enterprise Linux workstations, a Sun Enterprise 250 fileserver, a 16-processor IBM SP-2 distributed-memory message-passing multicomputer, an 8-processor IBM J-40 shared-memory multiprocessor, an 8-processor SGI Origin 2000 distributed shared-memory multiprocessor, and several PCs. These are connected via a high-speed fast Ethernet network.

Open Labs

Wilkinson Lab
The Wilkinson Computing Lab
includes several powerful Sun and Red Hat Enterprise Linux servers and 28 high-performance Sun Solaris workstations and 16 Windows XP PCs. A wide variety of graphics, CAD, circuit design/simulation, database, and other software packages are available on these machines.

Location: Tech M338

The Wilkinson Lab can be reserved.

 

The T-Lab - Teaching LabThe T-Lab ("Teaching Lab") consists of 16 high-end PCs connected to a storage server on a private network. The PCs include powerful graphics cards attached to large LCD displays, dual boot Linux and Windows XP, and are on a private network. They have a wide range of software installed and are used in numerous courses. The TLab can be used for studio instruction. As an adjunct to the TLab, WiFi and camera-enabled Pocket PC handheld computers are available for students to check out for project use with faculty approval.

Location: Tech F252 (near the second floor skybridge between Tech and Ford)  

The T-Lab can be reserved.

 

24/7 Lab24/7 Lab (Tech MG22)
Accessible via a swipe of a valid Wildcard at any time of the day or night, students can use the lab for personal projects and class-related work. The lab is equipped with power supplies, Oscilloscopes, Function Generators, DMMs, temperature controlled soldering stations and hand tools. The work surfaces are static dissipative and grounded. Three networked PCs, a device programmer, and a good assortment of electronic parts to get you started. Breadboards are available for sign-out (see Norm or Albert).

Look on the shelves and you will find magazines like Nuts and Volts (project oriented), Electronic Design, NASA Tech Briefs and Evaluation Engineering. The magazines are yours to keep, but please leave the catalogs in the lab for others.

Our goal is to give our students a great place to work on and develop their ideas. This lab is a work in progress. Please direct any questions, comments or feedback to Norm Flasch.

Please do observe the schedule on the door indicating formal labs or TA hours. Note too that this is NOT a research lab.

If you would like to purchase your own tool kit, we have the "Elenco TK-1500" available for $40.00.


Research Labs

 

 prescience-labP-Lab (Prescience Lab) - Prof. Peter Dinda 

The Prescience Lab has an IBM e1350 cluster, consisting of 33 dual Xeon nodes on a gigabit interconnect, access to the DOT optical research network, significant amounts of RAID storage, and a machine/equipment pool for research projects.   The lab also has infrastructure machines and 10 node cluster of of test machines geared for operating systems development.

 

 

QRG
QRG Lab - Prof. Ken Forbus

The Qualitative Reasoning Group has a symbolic supercomputer, consisting of 128 compute nodes yielding 2,048 cores and 4TB of RAM, to support their experiments with the Companion cognitive architecture, which is being used for both simulating aspects of human reasoning and learning, and to create new kinds of cognitive systems.  They also use Tablet PCs, in creating new kinds of sketch-based educational software, as well as the usual desktops and servers.